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AfterCast: An Audio Companion for the Classical, Charlotte Mason Mama

For many years now, Afterthoughts has been a sort of intellectual watering hole for all of you classical, Charlotte Mason homeschooling mamas out there – I like to call you Afterthinkers. You are thinking people – idea people – who never let a good book go to waste. You keep yourselves intellectually agile by reading books, often old books, seeking out the best that has been thought and said, and mixing it into your everyday lives of laundry and dishes and dinner and long division. At Afterthoughts, we have spent over a decade nourishing our minds on theology, educational philosophy, and a million other books and subjects thrown in – all the while bringing these ideas into a direct collision course with our daily lives. Because what good is an idea if we don’t use it – live it, breathe it? As an audio companion, this podcast is a chance to hear Afterthoughts blog posts rather than read them. Couple that with some bonus content focused on books and interviews, and you’ve got AfterCast.
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AfterCast: An Audio Companion for the Classical, Charlotte Mason Mama
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Oct 5, 2017

I received a couple questions recently regarding AmblesideOnline, Charlotte Mason, the teaching of history, memorization of timelines, and more that made me think of conversations I've had in the past with Karen Glass. I decided to use them as an excuse to have a conversation with her and record it for AfterCast. That's what I'm presenting to you today.

Karen Glass, if you aren't familiar with her, is the author of Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition, and also the brain behind Mind to Mind, an abridgment of Charlotte Mason’s sixth volume. Karen is part of the Advisory of AmblesideOnline. She has four children, ages 13 to 27, who have been homeschooled using Charlotte Mason’s methods from beginning to end. She has been studying and writing about Charlotte Mason and Classical Education for over twenty years.

Don't forget to download your BONUS!

 

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Sep 21, 2017

Today's episode discusses something I picked up in Charlotte Mason's book, Home Education ... that IDEAS are the food of the MIND. What are the implications of this? What about when children are limited in their ability to read and discover ideas for themselves? How does this change the way that we treat our children?

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

For Instagram, go to https://www.instagram.com/brandyvencel/ .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Sep 14, 2017

Today's episode isn't about homeschooling, unless you count the fact that it's part of my series, The Low-Energy Mom's Guide to Homeschooling. Life continues, even though we're homeschooling, and sometimes life gets ugly. Let's talk about why that is.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

For Instagram, go to https://www.instagram.com/brandyvencel/ .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Aug 31, 2017

In today’s episode, I have a bit of debate with a chapter in Clark and Jain’s book, The Liberal Arts Tradition. I love what they said in terms of philosophy, but I don’t think they took the practical implementation of their philosophy nearly far enough. I tried to provide what I think is a helpful push in the right direction.

 

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Aug 24, 2017

If you feel like you’re messing up your Charlotte Mason homeschool, the first thing you need to know is that you’re not alone. Returning to our basic principles – and remembering that principles and practices are not always the same thing – can help us focus on what matters most.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Aug 17, 2017

Homeschooling has a lot of side-benefits, as you probably know. These benefits aren’t reasons to homeschool, but they are good things nonetheless. We could talk about how children are able to get more sleep or have more free time. But are these the BEST kept secret? Nope. The best kept secret benefits US – the teachers – not the children. What is it? Keep listening and you’ll find out.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Feb 16, 2017

Why we don't need to rearrange the entire curriculum just because Johnny hates something on the day's agenda ... with some help from Aristotle via C.S. Lewis.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Feb 9, 2017

If a logos is a central organizing principle, then we should think about what is the central organizing principle of our homeschools. We might hope it is one thing when in fact it's another -- which means it's time to be honest with ourselves!

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Thanks for being an Afterthinker!

Feb 2, 2017

Eusebius, The Church History (translated by Paul Maier) is a book I've been reading with E-Age-Fourteen for our Bible/Church History category and it is just fantastic. It reminds me a lot of the book of Acts, and also Bede's Ecclesiastical History. I honestly think reading through it has been a great way to kick off high school.

In today's episode, I read an excerpt and then attempt to pull out a principle that I personally found helpful, and I hope you do, too. I'd tell you what that principle is, but I think it's nicer to hear it in context, so why not click that play button?

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Jan 26, 2017

Charlotte Mason's 2nd principle says, "[Children] are not born either good or bad, but with possibilities for good and for evil." This can trip some people up, especially Protestants.

When we look at the context of hereditary determinism, we start to understand what she was fighting against. That's what we're doing today: using a bit of Charles Dickens in order to understand the historical context.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Jan 19, 2017

When it comes to parenting, I can have an overwhelming desire to intervene. Unfortunately, this desire can interrupt the necessary process of learning through experience. I needed to take drastic measures in order to protect my children ... from ME. Thus the genesis of my Don't Look Theory of Parenting.

Turns out, it's far less tempting to intervene if you're not looking.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Jan 12, 2017

 

Charlotte Mason once said that "all education is self-education." Okay. That's great. But what if my child is a late bloomer? Does this mean that I as the mother need to start being more aggressive and take my child's learning in my own hands? Can I MAKE learning happen?

Is it possible that our jobs as mother-teachers requires patience more than anything else?

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

To find Brandy on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/AfterthoughtsBlog .

Jan 7, 2017

When Charlotte Mason was asked her opinion on "moral instruction direct and indirect," she offered an interesting third way: wide reading. Today, we'll talk about how wide reading feeds the imagination which fuels moral development.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

Jan 5, 2017

I met someone who told me she didn't require narration because her child like to jump straight to discussion -- and the discussions were good ones, so that was that. In order to decide whether or not discussion can replace narration like that, we need to think through what narration is and why we do it.

To access the posts and show notes for this podcast, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/podcast .

To support the show, go to afterthoughtsblog.net/donate .

Dec 31, 2016

For many years now, Afterthoughts has been a sort of intellectual watering hole for all of you classical, Charlotte Mason homeschooling mamas out there – I like to call you Afterthinkers. You are thinking people – idea people – who never let a good book go to waste. You keep yourselves intellectually agile by reading books, often old books, seeking out the best that has been thought and said, and mixing it into your everyday lives of laundry and dishes and dinner and long division.

At Afterthoughts, we have spent over a decade nourishing our minds on theology, educational philosophy, and a million other books and subjects thrown in – all the while bringing these ideas into a direct collision course with our daily lives. Because what good is an idea if we don’t use it – live it, breathe it? As an audio companion, this podcast is a chance to hear Afterthoughts blog posts rather than read them. Couple that with some bonus content focused on books and interviews, and you’ve got AfterCast.

In this first brief episode, Brandy explains what AfterCast is all about and what the different types of episodes are all about.

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